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Standing in front of an 8,000-square-foot black tarp on the banks of the Allegheny River to signify a large work area, several organizations and a Pittsburgh city official said they couldn’t stand behind ALCOSAN’s proposed plan for river-front construction.

“We have come so far as a city and community in revitalizing our river fronts from places where people didn’t want to go to these cultural and recreational destinations,” said Stephan Bontrager, spokesperson for Riverlife, an organization that guides the development of the city’s river fronts. “So to undo that investment would be a tragedy, especially when there are such simple solutions that can be done with landscapes that enhance the investment we already have.”

Several other organizations, including the Clean Rivers Campaign, Bike PGH, the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group, Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, and the City of Pittsburgh, spoke out against the proposed construction of 18 drop shafts. The shafts would allow access to the tunnel construction ALCOSAN has agreed to as part of a federal consent decree. The mandate is in place to bring the sewer infrastructure into compliance with the Clean Water Act. Right now, during heavy rain or after snow melts, stressed pipes overflow with stormwater and sewage into the region’s waterways.

Read the full article at Pittsburgh City Paper